FRIED DUMPLINGS

Hey everyone!

It’s come to my attention that fried dumplings isn’t as common as I thought! So I’d like to share how I make it.

In the Caribbean, dumplings are traditionally made to go along with stews and curries. It’s a basic recipe really, flour, water or coconut milk and salt to taste.

My brother-in-law actually showed me how to make fried dumplings and that’s the way I’ve eaten them ever since!

It’s a lot more flavorful than plain dumplings and just smelling it makes my mouth water 😂😂 So here’s what I do, start with a basic recipe for ‘Cow Tongue’ Dumplings

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cups flour
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • pinch of sugar
  • 3/4 cup warm water or coconut milk

DIRECTIONS

  1. Mix the  dry ingredients together and add water, knead the ingredients to make a firm dough, cover and let rest for 15 mins.
  2. Bring a medium pot of water to a boil and add some salt.
  3. Shape and add the dumplings to boiling water for about 10-15 mins, they will float to the top when done.

4. Drain the dumplings. At this point you can eat the dumplings with your favorite stews or curries or smoked herring and saltfish dishes 😋😋😋

 

 

But we’re adding some extra oomph!

FRIED DUMPLINGS

Ingredients

  • Slice 1 small onion
  • Mince 3 cloves garlic
  • Chop a small handful of cilantro (or shadow benny/ bandania )
  • Mince a couple pimento peppers (or you can use Bertie’s Pimento Sauce )
  • Half or a whole hot pepper (if you’re brave 😁)
  • Golden Ray
  • Oil (I like to use avocado, but you can use whichever you like)
  • Salt to taste

DIRECTIONS

  1. Heat a couple of tbsps of oil and about 1 or 2 tbsps of golden Ray in a large frying pan.
  2. Add the onions, garlic, cilantro, pimento, hot pepper and some salt.
  3. Let it cook and then add the boiled dumplings and toss to coat and let it fry for a few mins.

     

  4. Add your favorite sides and enjoy!!!

 

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GOOLAB JAMOON

Here we have my favorite Indian sweet with a Caribbean twist, goolab jamoon. The fragrant, rich dough is heavenly. It’s the second sweet that I learned make from my mama *grandmother*. Now I’ve visited a couple Indian restaurants in the US and whenever I order the goolab jamoon I get something totally different! It’s these round balls soaked in syrup. Which leads me to believe that the recipe must have changed on its way to the Caribbean from India.

Nevertheless both are deliciously sweet and I can easily eat them all in one sitting 😂😂

INGREDIENTS

1 cup butter
4 cups flour
1 tsp ground cardamom
1/2 cup powdered milk
1 can condensed milk
1/2 cup evaporated milk
1 cup oil for frying
2 cups white sugar
1 tsp grated ginger
4 cups water

DIRECTIONS

1. Rub butter into the flour, cardamom and powdered milk until crumbly

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2. Add the other milks to the flour and knead lightly to combine. * Or use a food processor with dough blade*

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3. Form almond shapes about 2 inches long and deep fry until golden brown

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4. Boil sugar, ginger and water to a thick syrup (it should spin a thread when the spoon is raised)
5. Pour syrup over the fried goolab jamoon and stir continuously until the sugar crystallizes .

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JERK PORK

I absolutely love Jamaican food, but jerk pork is one of my favorites, it’s so spicy, savory and juicy and mouth watering and you get the point! Pair this up with some rice and peas and salsa and fried plantains and a couple festivals *a sweet fried dough* and BAM! You’re an islander ha!

The best part is how easy it is to make! My marinade of choice is Walkerswood Jerk Seasoning. I let my pork marinate for a day or more, and then I toss it in the oven at 350 F for 35 mins, and then move the pork to the grill over medium low heat. Baste with your favorite BBQ sauce and let the meat slowly cook and the sauce to caramelize beautifully. Let cool, then cut and serve.

INGREDIENTS

  • Country style pork ribs ( you can use chops too)
  • Jerk seasoning marinade *I prefer Walkerswood hot and spicy*
  • Lime juice

DIRECTIONS

  • Wash the pork with lime juice.
  • Add 1-2 ozs of marinade  per pound of pork.*I love Walkerswood jerk marinade but there are other brands*
  • Massage marinade into meat. *please wear gloves if you don’t want your hands to be on fire*
  • Let pork marinate for at least 2 hours or over night for intense heat and flavor.
  • Bake pork at 350F for 30 mins. Reserve about 1/4 cup of drippings.
  • Add the drippings to 2 cups of your favorite BBQ sauce and reduce.
  • Put pork on grill over medium to low heat and baste with your sauce.
  • Cook until finished!

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JAMAICAN RICE AND PEAS

Let me start off by confusing you! This dish isn’t actually made with peas, it’s made with beans, red beans, also called kidney beans! Are you still there? *crickets chirping* PERFECT! I love Jamaican rice and peas, with jerk pork or jerk chicken or escovitched fish and fried plantains with a side of festivals *a sweet fried dough*.

I’ve had a lot of exposure to Jamaican foods. I worked at JAMWEST Caribbean foods for a while and the best part was getting to eat all the delicious food everyday and listening to Jamaican Patois that I could barely understand, and listening to stories from Chef Patrick while he cooked corn meal porridge :). It was truly amazing watching the giant pots of rice and barrels of jerked meats being cooked, and that rum cake from Miss Verona was so divine. Oh and how could I forget about the patties, and fresh juices and hiding in the walk in fridge to ‘sample’ dishes and getting locked inside hehehehe. Good times!

Here’s a much smaller recipe for rice and peas
  • 8 ounces small dried red beans or 8 ounces red kidney beans
  • 1 quart water
  • 16 ounces chicken broth or 16 ounces chicken stock or 16 ounces water
  • 1cup coconut milk
  • 2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves
  • 1teaspoon ground allspice
  • 2 scallions, finely chopped
  • 1cup white onion, chopped
  • 2 minced garlic cloves
  • 1/2  teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 1teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1 scotch bonnet pepper (left whole) or you can slice it if you want lots of heat!
  • 1 teaspoon brown sugar
  • 2 1cups uncooked long grain rice

DIRECTIONS

  1. Rinse and sort beans and place in a stockpot.
  2. Cover with several inches of water and soak overnight,-or- bring to a boil, boil gently for 3 minutes, then remove from heat, cover, and allow to sit undisturbed for 1 hour.
  3. Drain and rinse beans.
  4. Bring to a boil with chicken stock, water, and coconut milk.
  5. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer for 1 1/2-2 hours or until beans are tender and creamy.
  6. Add the thyme, allspice, scallion, onion, garlic, scotch bonnet, brown sugar, uncooked rice, salt and pepper.
  7. Check the level of liquid over the rice and make sure there is at least one inch of liquid (if not, you may add water or broth to cover).
  8. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover and simmer for 20-30 minutes or until rice is tender.
  9. Serve hot as a side dish.
  10. For vegetarian,use water not the chicken broth or stock.

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I served the rice and peas, along side jerk pork, which is cooked pretty much the same way as jerk chicken and a tropical salsa! Put some calypso music on in the background and I felt like I was back at home 🙂11064670_10155442019540431_2611953002881183454_o

DHAL

Dhal, a staple in Trinidadian cooking. We make this dish alongside curries or to be eaten alone like a soup or with roti *flat bread*. It’s healthy, flavorful and filling.

So funny story, when I was a teenager I was a bit rebellious *What? Really?! No way!*… I know, hard to believe right!? Anyway, my mom was forcing me to learn how to cook and I wanted no part of it, so I was throwing a hissy fit about cooking dhal and deliberately doing it wrong so she would just get mad at me and shoo me away. Well….she didn’t and I got a pot spoon thrown at me and she made me count each grain of dhal *split peas* in the package! Ever since then I’ve hated dhal and refused to make it! *Yeah! I’ll show her!!*

Years later, I’m pregnant and craving dhal and I didn’t know how to make it! According to Caribbean superstition, when you get pregnancy cravings and you don’t satisfy it, your child will be born with a birthmark shaped like what you were craving! And I was not about to have a child with a dhal birthmark on his head! 😁

Luckily my sister Giselle was visiting me and she is the best dhal maker I know *Yeah! Take that mom!!*, so I paid close attention and wrote down this recipe. I like my dhal not too thick and not too runny, just in the middle.

RECIPE
1 cup yellow split peas
2 1/2 cups water
7 grains garlic
1/2 onion chopped (medium)
1/2 habanero pepper ( keep whole if you want the flavor and not the heat)
1/4 tsp saffron powder
2 pimento peppers finely chopped (or you can use jalapeños)
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1 tsp whole geera (cumin)

DIRECTIONS

1. Soak split peas for a couple hours and drain.
2. Boil 2 1/2 cups of water and then add the peas.
3. Add the 5 garlic grains, onion, peppers and saffron powder.
4. Let boil until peas are very soft and tender.
5. In a small pan, heat oil and add 2 grains garlic and geera, let it brown over low heat.When the garlic is brown, carefully pour the oil mixture into your split peas. (This process is called chunkaying)

6. Whisk the mixture or puree until smooth and add salt to taste (about a tsp)

TIP: If your dhal is too thick you can add hot water until you get to your desired texture.

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EGGS AND SALTFISH

Hey guys! So I’m still under the weather *bummer* and I find that dishes from my home always make me feel a little better. Today I made a quick breakfast that my mom always made a few times a week.

It’s really just eggs, saltfish *salted cod or bacalao*, sliced onions and a piece of hot pepper *I use habanero*. Boil the fish for a few minutes to remove some of the salt and shred it. Slice the onions and pepper. Add about a tbsp of oil (coconut or vegetable) to frying pan and heat. Sauté onions, saltfish and pepper until lightly browned, add your eggs and stir until cooked through. Serve with avocado slices, roti *flat bread* or wraps and more pepper sauce if you can handle it, my favorite is Berties pepper and pimento sauces. 😋

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JERK SALMON

That salmon was such a jerk but he sure tasted good! hahahaha… what… you don’t get it? It’s ok, it’s an inside Caribbean joke. Nevermind! Ha!

Jerk is a style of cooking native to Jamaica in which meat is dry-rubbed or wet marinated with a very hot spice mixture called Jamaican jerk spice. Jerk seasoning is traditionally applied to pork and chicken. Modern recipes also apply jerk spice mixes to fish, shrimp, shellfish, beef, sausage, lamb, and tofu. Jerk seasoning principally relies upon two items: allspice (called “pimento” in Jamaica) and Scotch bonnet peppers. Other ingredients include cloves, cinnamon, scallions, nutmeg, thyme, garlic, and salt.

It really is so simple to do! My preferred brand of Jerk Marinade is called Walkerswood. You can get mild *no true Caribbean person with self-respect ever buys mild!* or the hot and spicy!  You slather the marinade on and let it do its thing for a few hours or overnight, if you dare and then you grill or bake over a medium to low heat until finished. Let it rest a bit and then prepare your taste buds for the spicy, savory, melt in your mouth goodness *insert Homer Simpson drool* Easy peasy!